Bars in the Windows, Truly Gone Fishing

All week, been feeling like a heroin addict on sabbatical. Shaky, super highs and lows, bit of nausea, heaviness, tired then wide awake, mind in a million different directions.

My first consideration was that I was with child. God loves me this week, and t'was not the case.

After my inability to kick it through the power of positive thought, I decided to go to the doctor. I explained my symptoms, she asked me a number of questions, then told me this was a temporary concern and she's sorry I'm going through it. Huh?

She then handed me a prescription for Xanax. Not, um, what I was expecting.

If you read my blog regularly, then you know I have often alluded or made comments about Xanax being the answer to life's little mishaps. However, I have never actually taken or been prescribed Xanax (even had to check how to SPELL it), or any other anxiety or depression medication for that matter. It was a societal reference to which many can relate, and a way to inject humor into an otherwise not so humorous situation.

Seems I am now the punchline. Diagnosed as "one that needs it",  at least temporarily, and according to the doctor one among many Many MANY. Kind of kills the buzz.

I will say they are much nicer at the pharmacy when picking up this type of medication--with others, they throw the bag at me and mutter "hope you die" under their breath. This time, they were lighthearted and funny, as if I might completely lose my shit if they said the wrong thing. So interesting.

On principle, I am going to try and make it without these meds. I'm certain this is yet another one of those "every seven years" hormone changes we women go through in life. Last time, I lost 22 lbs, ended my engagement and moved to a new city.

Might need that Xanax after all.

Comments

  1. I enjoy your writing! You certainly have a gift and......the apple doesn't fall from the tree (if you get my drift)
    Love you,
    Mom

    ReplyDelete

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